PU rPERllNDUNGAN BAYI IBABYHATCHJ

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  • Disusun oleh:PERPUSTAKAAN NEGARA MALAYSIA

    PAKEJAN MAKLUMAT

    PU rPERllNDUNGAN BAYIIBABY HATCH J

  • lSI KANDUNGAN

  • ISI KANDUNGAN

    1. PENGENALAN

    2. SUMBER : MONOGRAF

    3. SUMBER : JURNAL / MAJALAH

    4. SUMBER : INTERNET

    5. SUMBER : ELEKTRONIK

    6. RUJUKAN

  • SENARAIKANDUNGAN

  • Senarai Kandungan

    1. Pengenalan

    2. Sumber Jurnal & Majalah

    2.1 Al Islam Baby Hatch Usaha KPJ-ISH Selamatkan Nyawa Si Kecil 2.2 al islam Buang Anak Punca Dan Penyelesaiannya

    3. Sumber Internet http://www.orphancare.org.my

    4. Sumber Elektronik

    4.1 Sumber Nst Emedia

    300 pasangan nanti giliran 21 bayi di Baby Hatch sejak Mei Tokoh Islam setuju penubuhan Baby Hatch Proses dakwaan kes dera, buang bayi dipercepat Banyak Permintaan Nyawa bayi lebih penting Transit harapan Bayi terbuang rebutan ramai Baby Hatch langkah bijak selamatkan bayi OrphanCARE terima bayi lelaki pertama Hargai nyawa si kecil Raising funds to save more unwanted babies nationwide A place for baby More baby hatches to meet rising demand Slow start, but it has saved lives 14 babies in safe homes in six months 8 more baby hatches by month-end, says Ong Seeking ideal sites for baby hatches A case for more baby hatches First baby left at hatch adopted Solutions from Welfare Dept A choice between life and death Many call in hoping to adopt baby boy Parents undecided on baby boy left at hatch Hatch a practical solution, for now Dont close the door on them Job close to her heart No questions asked Creating a hatch without a catch Keep baby in focus Adopt an orphan, save a child Baby hatch necessary as alternative for unwed mums Unwanted babies to be placed in hatch Dont waste time, save the babies

    http://www.orphancare.org.my/

  • Support good NGO ideas Nobodys child gets to live Organisation to go ahead with baby hatch plan Drop birth cert rule Baby hatch to be set up

    4.2 Sumber Blis.Bernama

    OrphanCare pelawa Rumah Anak Yatim lain bekerjasama wujudkan rumah anak jagaan

    30 OrphanCare babies given to foster families OrphanCare serah 30 bayi kepada keluarga angkat sejak setahun lalu OrphanCare urges ministry to set up more baby hatches OrphanCares first adoptive parents found OrphanCare serahkan bayi lelaki kepada keluarga angkat OrphanCare dan jabatan kebajikan bincang nasib bayi OrphanCares first adoptive parents yet to be decided

    5. Rujukan

  • PENGENALAN

  • Baby hatch From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Baby hatch in Germany

    Baby hatch called "BabyBox" in the Czech Republic

    Baby hatch in Poland

    1

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Babyklappe.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Babybox_-_venkovn%C3%AD_strana.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:BabyBoxPoland.JPGhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_Republichttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poland

  • 2

    A baby hatch is a place where mothers can bring their babies, usually newborn, and leave them anonymously in a safe place to be found and cared for. This kind of arrangement was common in mediaeval times and in the 18th and 19th centuries, when the device was known as a foundling wheel. Foundling wheels were taken out of use in the late 19th century but a modern form, the baby hatch, began to be introduced again from 1952[1] and since 2000 has come into use in many countries, notably in Germany where there are around 80 hatches and in Pakistan where there are over 300[1] today.

    In German-speaking countries the hatch is known as a Babyklappe (baby hatch or flap) or Babyfenster (baby window); in Italian as Culla per la vita (life cradle); in Japanese as (storks' cradle) or (baby post).

    The hatches are usually in hospitals or social centres and consist of a door or flap in an outside wall which opens to reveal a soft bed, heated or at least insulated. Sensors in the bed alert carers when a baby has been put in it so that they can come and take care of the child. In Germany, babies are first looked after for eight weeks during which the mother can return and claim her child without any legal repercussions. If this does not happen, after eight weeks the child is put up for adoption.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_abandonmenthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_abandonmenthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediaevalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#cite_note-times-0http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#cite_note-times-0http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_languagehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_languagehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_languagehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoption

  • Contents

    1 History 2 Reasons for using baby hatches 3 Legal aspects

    o 3.1 Austria o 3.2 Czech Republic o 3.3 France o 3.4 Germany o 3.5 Japan o 3.6 Great Britain o 3.7 Belgium

    4 International situation 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

    History

    Foundling wheel at the "Ospedale Santo Spirito" in Rome

    Baby hatches have existed in one form or another for centuries. The system was quite common in mediaeval times. From 1198 the first foundling wheels (ruota dei trovatelli) were used in Italy; Pope Innocent III decreed that these should be installed in homes for foundlings so that women could leave their child in secret instead of killing them, as this practice was clearly evident in the River Tiber. A foundling wheel was a cylinder set upright in the outside wall of the building, rather like a revolving door. Mothers placed the child in the cylinder, turned it around so that the

    3

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vondelingenluikje.JPGhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vondelingenluikje.JPGhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Historyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Reasons_for_using_baby_hatcheshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Legal_aspectshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Austriahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Czech_Republichttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Francehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Germanyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Japanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Great_Britainhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Belgiumhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#International_situationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#See_alsohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#Referenceshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_hatch#External_linkshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_abandonmenthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Innocent_IIIhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infanticidehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Tiber

  • baby was inside the church, and then rang a bell to alert caretakers. One example which can still be seen today is in the Santo Spirito hospital at the Vatican City; this wheel was installed in mediaeval times and used until the 19th century.

    In Hamburg, Germany, a Dutch merchant set up a wheel (Drehladen) in an orphanage in 1709. It closed after only five years in 1714 as the number of babies left there was too high for the orphanage to cope with financially. Other wheels are known to have existed in Kassel (1764) and Mainz (1811).

    Foundling wheel at the "Ospedale degli Innocenti" in Florence

    In France, foundling wheels (tours d'abandon, abandonment wheel) were introduced by Saint Vincent de Paul who built the first foundling home in 1638 in Paris. Foundling wheels were legalised in an imperial decree of January 19, 1811, and at their height there were 251 in France, according to Anne Martin-Fugier, a writer on women's issues. They were in hospitals such as the Hpital des Enfants-Trouvs (Hospital for Foundling Children) in Paris. However, the number of children left there rose into the tens of thousands per year, as a result of the desperate economic situation at the time, and in 1863 they were closed down and replaced by "admissions offices" where mothers could give up their child anonymously but also received advice. The tours d'abandon were officially abolished in a law of June 27, 1904. Today in France, women are allowed to give birth anonymously in hospitals (accouchement sous X) and leave their baby there.

    In Brazil and Portugal, foundling wheels (roda dos expostos , literally "wheel for exposed ones") were also used after Queen Mary I proclaimed on May 24, 1783 that all towns should have a foundling hospital. One example was the wheel installed at the Santa Casa de Misericordia hospital in So Paulo on July 2, 1825. This was taken out of use on June 5, 1949 , declared incompatible with the modern social system after five years' debate. A Brazilian film on this

    4

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ruota_Innocenti.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vatican_Cityhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kasselhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mainzhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ospedale_degli_Innocentihttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florencehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_de_Paulhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parishttp://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Anne_Martin-Fugier&action=edit&redlink=1http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=H%C3%B4pital_des_Enfants-Trouv%C3%A9s&action=edit&redlink=1http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parishttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portugalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_I_of_Portugalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A3o_Paulo

  • subject, Roda Dos Expostos, directed by Maria Emlia de Azevedo, won an award for "Best Photography" at the Festival de Gramado in 2001.

    Foundling Hospital in London

    In Britain